Cream – Sunshine of Your Love

There are not many bands that can lay claim to have invented a genre, but Cream are one such band. All had served British blues apprenticeships: Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker with the Graham Bond Organisation, and Eric Clapton with the Yardbirds and John Mayalls Bluesbreakers. And then they got together to form Cream. A blues rock supergroup that would create some of the finest music of the 1960s.

Cream: Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, and Jack Bruce playing “Sunshine of Your Love” live circa 1968. What a performance too. Great musicianship. Jack Bruce and Eric Clapton were obviously two very influential musicians, and sales of the Gibson EB3 bass and Gibson SG Standard peaked in the late 1960s. “Sunshine of Your Love” hails from the absolute classic album Disraeli Gears (along with “Strange Brew” and “Tales of Brave Ulysees”).


Disraeli Gears

With that day-glo cover and Sunshine of Your Love ! Also from 1967.Fresh Cream, the album that introduced this seminal super-blues trio to America, was perhaps a bit too blues-based to do the advance hype ("Clapton is God!") justice. Two of its three best-known tracks, after all, were blues covers. It was Disraeli Gears that turned Cream into a "supergroup." Here they pursue the psychedelic ideals of the era with total abandon (the LP cover art still stands as one of the 1960s' most striking designs), merging these ideals with their take on the blues and adorning the amalgamation with some superb pop craftsmanship. Of the eleven originals here, four--"Tales of Brave Ulysses," "SWLABR," "Strange Brew," and "Sunshine of Your Love"--earned major airplay. This, their excess-free greatest moment, does the Cream legend proud. --Bill Holdship

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2 thoughts on “Cream – Sunshine of Your Love

  1. Great to see them all (but for me as a bassist, especially Jack Bruce) playing up so close. And a Gibson EB3 through a stack of Marshall 4x12s… say no more! One of the best youtube videos there is!

  2. Classic guitar track, as we all know, but on this take, it’s Jacks vocal and Gingers drums that really stand out for me, rather than the guitars – although there is some tasty bluesy jamming around the three minute mark, and onwards. Is this available on DVD?

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